Brussels



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Brussels
Aside from a variety of museums and galleries, Brussels has a wide range of unusual and interesting landmarks. The most notable of these include:
Grand Place - Surrounded by the city tower and a range of beautiful 300 year old buildings. In the evening, surrounded by bright lumination, it is simply ravishing. Some evenings a music and light show is provided with the buildings serving as a canvas. Have a "gaufre de Liège-Luikse wafel" here (Belgian waffle with caramelized sugar)—the best ones are available from the little shops off the northeast corner of the Grand Place-Grote Markt. Manneken Pis - Just a short walk from the Grand Place-Grote Markt is the Manneken Pis, a small bronze statue thought to represent the "irreverent spirit" of Brussels. This statue of a child performing one of Nature's most basic functions. Belgians have created hundreds of outfits for this statue. There are many stories of the statue's significance. It is believed to have been inspired by a child who, while in a tree, found a special way to drive away invading troops. Another story goes that a father was missing his child and made a declaration to the city that when he found him he would build a statue of him, doing whatever it was that he was doing. It has also been said a witch turned him to stone for peeing on her property. None are definitively true. Parc du Cinquantenaire-Jubelpark - Definitely check out the Arc de Triomphe-Triomfboog on the east side of town. It's in the Parc du Cinquantenaire-Jubelpark. It is possible to go up to the terrasse above the arch, from where you'll have a good view of the city. Entry is through the Royal Museum of the Armed Forces and of Military History and is free. Take Metro line 1 east, exit Schuman and walk east or exit Mérode and walk west. Atomium - Unavoidable icon of Belgium and a unique creation in the history of architecture and emblematic vestige of the World Fair in Brussels (Expo 58), the Atomium continues to embody its ideas of the future and universality, half a century later. Five of the nine spheres are open to the public. One of them houses a permanent exhibition dedicated to Expo 58. Mini-Europe - Hosts a set of scale models of famous European structures. €12.90 Adults; €9.70 under 12. Statue of Europe - Also referred to as Unity in Peace, this sculpture symbolises peace through European integration, while at the same time aiming to demonstrate the motto of the European Union (EU), United in Diversity. It is located in the garden of Convent Van Maerlant (the library of the European Commission) in front of Maurice Schumann Place, "Chaussée d'Etterbeek/Etterbeeksesteenweg", in the European Quarter of Brussels.